Timestamps in Parquet on Hadoop

One of main advantages of open source Hadoop environment is that we are free to choose different tools that will make up our Big Data platform. No matter what kind of software distribution you decide to use, most of the times you can freely customise it by adding extra frameworks or upgrading versions on your own. The free choice of products gives great flexibility but also can cause a lot of difficulties when orchestrating different parts together. In this post I’d like to share some of the problems with handling timestamp on Parquet files.

Timestamp is commonly used and supported data type. You can find it in most of the frameworks but it turns out that tools can store and interpret it quite differently which will end up in wrong results or even hours spent on debugging your data workflow.

Timestamp in Hive

Hive supports Timestamp since version 0.8. They are interpreted as timestamps in local time zone (so the actual value is stored in parquet file as UTC) [4]. When timestamps are read from the file server’s time zone is applied on the value to give local timestamp. Of course, such behaviour depends on the file format. Text file format don’t imply any conversions to UTC.

Timestamp in Impala

In Impala timestamps are saved in local time zones, which is different than in Hive. Because historically Impala-Hive operability was very important, there are some workarounds to make coexistence of these two frameworks possible. The following impalad start-up parameter will add proper handling for timestamps in Hive-generated parquet file:

convert_legacy_hive_parquet_utc_timestamps=true (default false) [2]

It is worth mentioning that parquet file metadata is used to determine if the file was created in Hive or not. parquet-tools meta <file> command is helpful to see the creator of the file.

There is also Hive option to allow reading Impala’s files. Parameter hive.parquet.timestamp.skip.conversion is by default set to true and it means that parquet files created in Impala won’t have time zone applied, because the timestamps are already saved in local time zone.

Timestamp in Spark

Spark-Hive interoperability is fine. Every time we read timestamp column we have correct timestamp. The problem begins when we read in Spark tables created in Impala. In such case Spark apply server timezone to file which already have local timestamps and as a result we get different timestamps.

The main problem is that Spark (up to the newest version 2.2.0) doesn’t provide any special handling for Impala parquet files. So every time we have any scripts in Impala that process data later used in Spark we need to stay aware of the problems. Keep in mind that there are various Impala and Hive parameters that can influence the timestamp adjustments.

Sqoop

Even more problems if we add Sqoop to the workflow. Sqoop stores timestamp in Parquet as INT64 which makes the imported parquet file incompatible with Hive and Impala. These two tools will return errors when reading sqoop’s parquet files with timestamps. The funny thing is that Spark will read such file correctly without problems.

Timestamp in Parquet

Parquet is one of the most popular columnar format the is supported by most of the processing engines available on Hadoop. Its data types include only BOOLEAN, INT32, INT64, INT96, FLOAT, DOUBLE and BYTE_ARRAY[1]. Timestamps is defined as a logical type (TIMESTAMP_MILLIS, TIMESTAMP_MICROS) [5], but since Impala stores the timestamp up to nanosecond precision, it was decided to use INT96. Other frameworks followed Impala to use INT96, but time zone interpretation compatibility was somehow missed.

In SQL database

So, how is it done in SQL database?

In Oracle for example we have TIMESTAMP for storing timestamp without timezone information, but with defined precision, TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE and TIMESTAMP WITH LOCAL TIME ZONE (where timestamp are stored in DB time zone and converted to session time zone when returning to the client) [7].

In Postgres we have two options too: TIMESTAMP (without time zone information) and TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE (which is stored as UTC and converted to local time zone after reading) [8].

It could be helpful to have such choice on Hadoop.

Conclusion

Because Hadoop is open ecosystem with multiple independently-developed components sometimes it’s possible to find areas where there are some incompatibilities between components. Handling timestamp is a good example of such problem. Although there are some workaround to this known issue, some cases are still quite hard to detect and overcome. It is also a good example of typical difficulties with complex and open environment when compared to product designed and developed by single vendor.

References